Eclectus Parrots for Sale – Last baby available!

The day has come where we have one last baby available for adoption. I am not sure whether to be elated as we can finally take a break from the four hourly feeds, or to be sad as there will no longer be the pitter patter of baby birdie feet in our parrot room.

IMG_7404I am sure that in a few years our Eckie hens will again con us into re-hanging their nest boxes but for now they are enjoying a well earned rest. Our top breeder, Red, is sitting atop my iMac as I type, perched on one foot with her beak tucked firmly behind her wing. Winter has come to visit and she is enjoying the warmth the computer shares.

We fittingly named our last little baby, Omega, and what a spunky girl she is. Her name can be changed but I am positive that her assertive yet snuggly demeanor is here to stay. Omega is a Blue and Cletus baby. Cletus is undoubtedly our most popular father among our Parrot Haven family and Blue is the daughter of the always sought after hen, Red. This makes for an amazing genetic combination. We kept the very first Blue and Cletus baby because we fell head over heals in love with her personality and spunky attitude. We soon learned that all Blue and Cletus babies possess this personality trait and little Omega is following in her sisters footsteps.

Eclectus ParrotWe want to find the perfect home for our gorgeous girl and have been very choosy to ensure she is paired correctly with the right forever parents. I know that whoever is owned by our enigmatic baby is in for a treat.

If you would like to become a part of the Parrot Haven family, please feel free to send us an email and we can arrange a time to talk.

Soon-to-be Eckie slaves can also download our book, The Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots. Our book has received many wonderful reviews, has a five star rating in the iBook store and is on the best sellers list.

Eclectus care

Eclectus Parrots – The experience behind the author

As an Eclectus specialist, I spend a great deal of time working with my many Eclectus parrots. From researching dietary changes, developmental phases, bonding, molting, illness, incubation and hand rearing, reproduction and incubation to working closely with my many clients. It is a constant learning curve and one I happily continue from day to day.

_MG_4958

Over the years I have received emails from people who read incorrect information and followed this advice believing the person or website/forum or blog they learned from was written by an avian expert. They believed they were reading material written by someone with many years experience working with and researching Eclectus parrots based on their own experience with multiple parrots of this species.

Eclectus ParrotsI know for a fact there are many knowledgable pet owners in our avian community, those who research other peoples work or from their own experience as a parrot slave and like to share this with the online community. I have very close friends who have helped countless people from around the world with their many Eckie related issues however they are the first to say that they are not an expert. The knowledge they have acquired is based from their experience with their own few pet Eclectus and the countless hours of research of others work that they have undertaken both in books and online. Unfortunately not all information is interpreted correctly and when someone is writing based on another persons hard earned research, things can be mis-interpreted and this can lead to incorrect information being perpetuated. On the other side there are many websites on the net written by passionate avian lovers who share good quality information and that is fantastic as without them I would have been lost in my early days.

_MG_6867

So how do we know when someone is undertaking extensive research based on their own findings or simply sharing what they have learned from others? As I say to any Eckie enthusiast when asked the validity of information, you need to question the experience behind the author. If you have doubts or wonder how they came to learn this, just ask.

_MG_9933

Prior to writing my book I took time to reflect on my own avian experience and asked myself the most important question. Why should people listen to my advice? At the time of writing I had 13 years experience under my belt, not just researching the internet but working with my then 26 Eclectus parrots and the many babies I hand raised. I worried that people may see me as just another Eckie lover with a few gorgeous kids wanting to share what I had read. However when I looked back on my experience and the years I spent working closely with my many feathered kids and their offspring, I knew I had a firm grasp on this species and was confident in my findings. Self doubt can be destructive but can also give you the reality check you need to pursue your dreams.

_MG_5503
I reassured myself that I had spent over a decade observing my Eclectus and documenting my findings, taking notes on their dietary changes, reproductive patterns, incubation techniques, hand raising process, molting, well the list goes on but in short my work was extensive. I learned that despite a common trend between my parrots, every single Eclectus was different. Each had different dietary needs during varying times of the year. Our Eclectus required different stimulus for mating, had their own cravings during incubation and then while raising their chicks. The males even tended to the hens differently. Some doted upon their girls, others were a little less chivalrous and would only do the bare minimum, yes Cletus, I am talking about you. Our Eckies personalties differed greatly, so too did the personality of the babies they produced. Their offspring had their own distinct likes and dislikes and when helping a client settle their new baby into their home, I could draw from my years of experience not only with bonding in general but also based on what worked in the past for this specific pairs baby.

_MG_5305Understanding that what works for one Eckie may not work for another intrigued me and made me reflect on the research I had undertaken in my very early years of aviculture when I relied on text books and the internet for help. I didn’t want to regurgitate other persons findings understanding that there is only so much you can learn in this manner. I felt that if I were to write a book and claim this research as my own then it must be done by observing, documenting and learning from multiple members of the same species over a span of many years.

I first began researching Eclectus parrots at the age of 23, by 24 I was a slave to ten Eckies, my life had changed forever. It wasn’t long before I realized the information I had learned in books and on the internet only scraped the surface of what I believed I knew. My parrots had so much to teach me and I was a willing student.

_MG_6867I began sharing my information slowly, waiting until I felt I had enough hands on experience with my then 25 Eclectus to share my findings and observations. I became close friends with a few highly experienced Aviculturists and we would chat for hours, talking about our findings and challenging each other with our different views and opinions. Back then I was still very new to aviculture, only 7 years into my avian career so I was like a sponge, absorbing any information I could from those who had based their life around our feathered friends. From there I chose to develop a website where I melded my two passions, aviculture and writing. I continued to research, observe my own Eclectus and learn from the best.

_MG_9883My website was met with people thirsting for avian knowledge, information they sought but were unable to find. The very first email I received from my website was from California where I met the man I was eventually to marry. Together we were able to determine his Eckie hen, Phoenix’s car phobia and eventually cure her of this fear. We began working together closely and as a graphic designer, Jason overhauled my first, very basic site and this developed into a blog and eventually a successful forum.

As 2013 rolled around and I felt I had acquired enough knowledge and experience to write my own book. Despite my hesitation, self doubt and obsessing over every shred of information we finally published our findings and our book has been met with great success. I feel confident in knowing that the information contained in this book and in the articles I write for avian magazines are gleaned from my own extensive experience, both with my own Eclectus and the help that I have given to countless people around the world including their feedback. I even receive emails from a man in Iceland! Who knew they had Eckies in such an inhospitable environment!

_MG_5305
I believe it pays to ask an important question before you take someones work or website to heart, including my own. Ask, ‘what is your experience with Eclectus? How extensively have you worked with them and what hands on research have you undertaken?’ The last thing we want is for people to receive incorrect information and for our feathered friends to suffer because in the long run, it is all about our Eckies well being. They are our main focus, everything we do, all the years of time and research I have undertaken has been for one sole purpose. To better the lives of our Eclectus and to help others care for their precious kids.

 

 

 

 

Eclectus parrots

Sourcing reliable Eclectus Parrot information

Beautiful Mia

Sourcing reliable avian information can be a hit and miss affair because many websites provide inaccurate and misleading information.

As an aviculturist and avid avian researcher I have read countless parrot related websites. Some sites are wonderful and it is evident the person writing the information has had many years of hands on experience. However, not all sites offer accurate information and before following any advice, it pay’s to take the time to learn about the author and their level of expertise.

The internet offers a plethora of avian knowledge, passed on from people from all levels of experience. There are sites written by avian experts and aviculturists keen to share their wealth of knowledge. Some are written by pet owners who own a few of their chosen species, are passionate about their pets and enjoy sharing knowledge they have. Other authors are simply regurgitating the information they have read on other sites or books and sometimes this can lead to the spread of mis-information.

I have seen my own work on other avian websites over the years, written word for word. On one such occasion I contacted the person and requested they remove the plagiarized content. I checked back later only to find my work re-worded however the author had made so many errors while changing my copy that the advice they were giving was harmful and potentially deadly. It made me shudder to think of people following such advice, especially at the detriment to their parrot.

Before following the advice of the author, be sure the content is true and correct, especially when reading advice pertaining to avian health. The best people to source knowledge from are those who specialize in your chosen parrot and have had many years keeping, breeding, hand raising and working with companion parrots.

Reading books, keeping a few pets and regurgitating information is all well and good but when it comes right down to it, nothing beats hands on experience. Professional aviculturists work day in day out with their parrots, they are immersed in everything avian and the information they share is invaluable. Two of my favorite avian writers are both professional aviculturists. Rosemary Low who worked for Loro Parque for many years and Eb Cravens who runs his parrot business in Hawaii. Both share a wealth of knowledge that was learnt from working directly with parrots from neonates to mature birds. The information they provide was gleaned from years of research, understanding every aspect of each parrots unique needs, comparing these needs with others of the species and of course lot’s of trial and error.

I have worked extensively with Eclectus parrots for over a decade now and have learned more than I could ever have imagined. I have enjoyed the best of both worlds. I kept Eckies as companion parrots, learning the in’s and out’s of pet ownership while helping other Eckie owners from around the world. I also spent many years breeding Eckies, this opened my eyes to an entirely different aspect of this magnificent species. Taking a parrot through their many varying growth stages to become a well adjusted, fully fledged companion bird is an amazing experience; one I had time and time again.

So next time you’re surfing the internet, be sure to check the sites ‘about us’ page. You will soon learn whether you are reading information written by a professional, a hobbyist or a pet owner. When it comes to the health and wellbeing of your parrot, experience is everything and you want to be sure the person giving the advice is qualified to do so. If you are researching information for medical issues, always seek the advice of your avian vet.

Happy researching!

Eclectus careEclectus Care

 

Choosing an Eclectus

Do male Eclectus make better pets than the females?

Female eclectus parrots DO make wonderful pets

 

 

 

 

 

There is nothing worse than being judged by others, especially when your reputation has been unjustly tarnished. Somehow, gorgeous Eckie hens everywhere have been labeled the problem children of the avian world. The Internet is rife with stories of hens being moody, temperamental, even labeled, ‘not pet material’. This couldn’t be further from the truth.

Eclectus hens do make fantastic pets. In fact, we have two gorgeous Eckie hens that rule our home. Mia and Moto are the most wonderful companion parrots you could ever wish for. They are incredibly smart and affectionate, both have an amazing vocabulary-which they use in context-and their antics have us in constant stitches. We love our girls and believe hens make amazing companion parrots.

A healthy female Eclectus Parrot

Are they both affectionate?

As juveniles our males tend to be a little cuddlier whereas our hens are a slightly more independent, although this varies from parrot to parrot. Our hens are usually the first to want their snuggle time, but they want it ‘their way’ and are quick to tell you if you’re not doing it exactly right. While the males are happy to sit and relax on the couch with Mum and Dad, play with their toys or have some preening time, the hens will be in mental overdrive. Having already mastered their puzzle toys, they spend time observing and taking in everything around them, assessing their environment and looking for different ways to get up to mischief. The hens love to break the rules and have some fun.

More snuggle time with Mumma

Do both genders talk?

Without a doubt. Both the male and females are incredible talkers. When we are in the aviary, I can barely hear myself think, let alone hold a conversation with Jason. Talking comes naturally to our feathered kids and if they are treated as an important member of the family they will want to communicate with their flock. This may be in the form of talking, whistling or chortling. Not all parrots talk and this is their choice. It doesn’t make them any less of a companion bird; it just means we can enjoy their beautiful natural calls and chatters.

The Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots
This is a short excerpt from our book The Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots’. This chapter explains the differences between the male and female Eclectus parrot. It helps soon-to-be Eckie owners make an informed decision.Also included in this book:

  • Choosing the right breeder
  • The vet check
  • Establishing a routine
  • Baby calls and noise factor
  • Dietary needs
  • Settling your Eckie into their new home
  • Establishing a routine
  • Emergency care
  • And many, many more topics!

To purchase our book click on the icon below!

Download on the iBookstoreWeb Eclectus book

Eclectus health

Health Information

Noticing and understanding slight changes in your Eckie is critical to saving their life. Our feathered kids will try to tell us they are sick and if we know what to look for, we can better understand their cues. Monitor your Eckie on a daily basis. Take note of slight changes in behaviour, eating habits, weight loss, mood changes, feather quality and droppings.

Keeping weight charts helps monitor normal weight fluctuations and alerts you to abnormal weight loss.

The basic signs of an unwell bird are as follows:

  • Fluffing up their feathers to retain body heat. Hunkering down close to the perch
  • Lethargy
  • Regurgitation – other than normal hormonal related regurgitation
  • Weakness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Continued sneezing (This is not always a sign of illness. Parrots may sneeze for a variety of reasons: dust, pollen, airborne irritants, change in weather, dry air or they may have a small feather irritating their nares. Ensure you monitor your Eckie closely to rule out irritants.)
  • Wet or dry encrusted mucus around the nares
  • Change in demeanour e.g. depression, aggression
  • Dirty feathers or unkempt plumage
  • Decreased vocalisation
  • Unusual droppings
  • Diarrhoea
  • Increased defecating
  • Increased thirst
  • Sudden feather picking or irritated behaviour
  • Vomiting (This is different to regurgitation-Parrots shake their heads vigorously when vomiting and food will often be found on the top of their head.)
  • Inability to perch including hunkering down on the bottom of the cage
  • Tail bobbing – can indicate respiratory infection and serious illness
  • Open mouth breathing – can indicate respiratory infection and serious illness
  • Dizziness – unable to stand up, unable to walk or fly
  • Head tilting abnormally
  • Seizures

If your Eckie is exhibiting any of the above symptoms, please seek veterinary assistance immediately. Don’t wait to see how they go. Parrots have lost their lives unnecessarily because people wait to see if the illness will get worse. Many illnesses can be overcome if detected and treated in the very early stages.

Eclectus care
We are dedicated to helping owners understand the importance of avian health. Our book ‘The Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots’ contains extensive information about Eclectus health, emergency care and how to keep your Eckie healthy and safe in the home.

This chapter includes information on:

  • Household dangers
  • Weight checks
  • The Eclectus moult
  • The importance of flight
  • The importance of worming
  • Nail trimming
  • Eckie safe plants
  • Abuse and neglect
  • Emergency care
  • And many more topics!

To purchase our book click on the icon below!

Download on the iBookstoreWeb Eclectus book

Eclectus Diet

Eclectus Diet

Eclectus Diet

Eckies love fruit and quite literally can’t get enough of it. Some prefer vegetables but I know all of ours choose fruits over their veggies any day. Parrots like their fruit ripe, but not overly ripe to the point of being spoilt. Never give your parrot ‘seconds’ from produce stores or farmers markets. Always buy your Eckie human grade fruit, which you yourself would be happy to eat. Ensure that you thoroughly wash all fruits and vegetables to remove potential pesticides or harmful chemicals.

We provide each Eclectus with stainless steel bowls 12.5 cm wide and 6 cm deep. This is filled to the brim with fresh fruit and vegetables every day and it always polished off come nightfall.

We feed our own Eckies the following food ratios

  • 60% of their diet is made up of fresh fruit and vegetables
  • 20% sprouted seed/legumes/pulses
  • The remaining 20% constitutes their hot meal

Always ensure you feed your Eckie more vegetables than fruit. Fruit is high in sugar and if consumed in too larger quantities can lead to unwanted weight gain. We always feed our kids 2/3 vegetables to 1/3 fruit.

Your Eckie’s appetite will fluctuate throughout the year. moulting, the onset of winter, growth phases and even hormonal changes will increase your Eckies appetite. I know our feathered kids eat us out of house and home when they are moulting. It is quite normal for juvenile Eckies to eat like teenage boys until they are approximately 8 months old. Their appetite starts to settle down after this time. Our clients are often amazed at just how much their new babies can consume.

Moulting

When a parrot moults, old feathers fall out and are replaced with new ones. It takes a large amount of energy for parrots to produce pinfeathers, especially if they are heavy moulters. Feathers are made from keratin which is a protein. If a parrot is not provided with protein rich foods to supplement this output, their body will be depleted.

Moulting can make our feathered kids cranky and moody and who can blame them. I would be pretty grumpy if I had pinfeathers sprouting from every direction. From my experience, increasing protein levels in our parrots’ diet helps overcome crankiness and eases them through this uncomfortable time.

The following foods are high in protein

  • Cooked meat and chicken
  • Boiled eggs (cooked right the way through)
  • Almonds
  • Pumpkin seeds (also known as pepitas)
  • Lentils and pulses
  • Chia
  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Sweet corn

At Parrot Haven, we have our own special moulting diet. We feed our moulting kids a cooked meal 3 times a week

Tips

Paw Paw helps restore the natural flora in the bird’s crop and gut.

Sweet corn is used when a bird has been sick and lost condition. It helps to put weight on a sick or underweight parrot.

The following should NEVER be fed to your Parrot

  • Avocado, both flesh and seed contains toxins deadly to birds
  • Rhubarb
  • Apple seeds
  • Seeds from stone fruit
  • Lettuce, has little nutritional value and can cause diarrhoea and lead to dehydration
  • Onions
  • Any raw meat
  • Garlic
  • Cheese, can cause crop impaction
  • Chocolate
  • Coffee
  • Soft drinks
  • Milk or dairy products, some birds are lactose intolerant and can also lead to crop impaction
  • Fatty foods or takeaway, e.g. Chinese food, beware of additives such as MSG, preservatives and un-natural flavours
  • Alcohol

Parrot safe foods

  • Apple
  • Apricot
  • Banana
  • Blackberry
  • Blackcurrant
  • Blueberry
  • Currant
  • Cherry
  • Coconut
  • Date
  • Dragonfruit
  • Fig
  • Gooseberry
  • Grape
  • Grapefruit
  • Guava
  • Huckleberry
  • Honeydew
  • Kiwi fruit
  • Lychee
  • Mandarin
  • Mango
  • Melon
  • Cantaloupe
  • Honeydew
  • Watermelon
  • Rock melon
  • Nectarine
  • Orange
  • Paw Paw
  • Peach
  • Pear
  • Plum/prune (dried plum)
  • Pineapple
  • Pomegranate
  • Purple Mangosteen
  • Raspberry
  • Rambutan
  • Redcurrant
  • Star fruit
  • Strawberry
  • Tangerine
  • Tomato (fruit only not the leaves or stem)
  • Watermelon-see melon
  • Pumpkin
  • Celery
  • Zucchini
  • Beans
  • Carrots
  • Red chilies (parrots don’t have capsaicin receptors. This means they do not feel heat from chilies)
  • Broccoli
  • Sweet potato (raw or cooked)
  • Sweet corn
  • Spinach
  • Peas
  • Cauliflower
  • Mushrooms
  • Asian vegetables
  • Snow peas
  • Asparagus
  • Berlotti beans
  • Black-eyed peas
  • Broad beans
  • Chickpeas
  • Common bean
  • Garbanzo
  • Green bean
  • Lentil
  • Lima bean
  • Mung bean
  • Navy beans
  • Peas
  • Peanut
  • Pinto beans
  • Runner bean – Raw
  • Span peas
  • Snow peas – Raw
  • Amaranth – raw or cooked
  • Bok Choy
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprout
  • Celery
  • Ceylon spinach
  • Collards
  • Dandelion
  • Endive
  • Garden rocket
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Pak Choy
  • Pea sprouts/leaves
  • Sorrel
  • Spinach
  • Watercress
  • Wheatgrass

 

Eclectus molting information

 Care for your Eclectus during their molt

Kirsten 068

After shivering through the cold winter months, Summer is finally here. It is a time for sunshine, weekend barbecues and relaxing by the pool. It is also the time when our Eckies begin to molt.

Parrot Haven is home to 25 Eckies and one precocious yet very special African Grey parrot and at the moment, all our feathered kids are molting. Our place is decorated with scatterings of feather casings, white fluffy down and the odd primary or two. The aviary is a variable smorgasbord of feathers, from tiny petite head feathers to beautiful tail plumage.

This happens twice year at Parrot Haven however the pre Christmas molt is always the heaviest. Molting can certainly take it’s toll on our parrots. I can only imagine how irritating it must be walking around like a pin cushion, as hundreds of new feathers erupt through the skin.

As parrot slaves, we must understand that molting affects our kids moods, dietary needs, appetite and even sleep patterns. It certainly takes a toll on our kids bodies and we must do all we can to ease our kids through this time.

What is molting?

Molting is a process where old feathers fall out and are replaced by new ones. Feathers are made from a protein called keratin, just like our hair and fingernails. Unlike skin, keratin is unable to repair itself. If a feather is damaged or frayed, it will remain that way until the parrot molts.

The importance of protein

When a parrot molts, protein is taken from the Eckie’s body. If a parrot is not provided with protein rich foods to supplement this output, their body will be depleted.

An Eckie suffering from protein deficiency will be tired, lethargic and irritable. It will prolong their molt and the newly molted feathers will look dull, lacking their trademark glossiness.

It is very important to feed your Eckie foods which are high in protein, such as:

  • Cooked meat and chicken
  • Boiled eggs (cooked right the way through)
  • Almonds
  • Pumpkin seeds (also known as pepitas)
  • Lentils and pulses
  • Chia
  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Sweet corn

Change in appetite

Molting affects our Eckies’ appetites. Some kids become ravenous eating machines, while others become very fussy eaters, craving certain foods and rejecting others. Monitor your Eckie’s appetite carefully when molting, and take note of specific foods they crave. Our feathered kids listen to their bodies, and will source foods that will help ease them through molting.

 Moodiness

Molting can make the demurest of Eckies cranky and short tempered. Their body is working in overdrive to produce hundreds of pin feathers and many become irritable. Please, do not take this personally as many people have experienced this with their feathered kids.

My hen, Red, is terribly short tempered while molting. I know there is very little room for error and if I mis-read her body language, I will receive a nasty bite. As much as this hurts, I don’t take this personally. I know that once she has finished molting, she will return to her sweet self.

Everyone copes with their Eckie’s moods differently. Some ignore cranky behavior, leaving their kid alone until they are in a better frame of mind. Others distract their Eckie by offering a new toy or food treats.

Some Eckies become little sooks. They seek the love and comfort of their owner and demand cuddles and affection. This too is normal. Some of our hens seek extra cuddles while molting. Once they have molted their neediness reduces and their moods return to normal.

Aloe spritzes

Aloe spritzes help moisturize the skin, keeping it soft and supple. This allows the developing pinfeathers to break through the skin more easily. It is simple and cheap to make.

We buy 100% pure aloe gel from our local health food store. We then put 1 tablespoon of aloe into a spray bottle and fill it with a cup of warm water. Our kids love being misted by the warm, moisturizing water, and the aloe gives their feathers a spectacular sheen.

Some people choose to use a pre-mixed aloe drink. Please ensure there are no additives before using this.

Sleepy time kids

Molting takes its toll on our kids’ small bodies. It takes a lot of energy to grow hundreds of feathers, and our Eckies become tired and lethargic. Your Eckie’s sleep routine may change around molting time.  Many will take long catnaps during the day. Others will want to go to bed earlier, or sleep in. They need this extra sleep; it helps the body recuperate, so when playtime rolls around, they are re-energized and ready for fun.

Lots of extra love

Molting is a stressful time for our feathered kids. They feel itchy and out of sorts. Some kids become despondent when they molt. They know they look scruffy and it really upsets them. They are such sensitive little souls.

As devoted Eckie parents, we want to do everything we can to help our kids through this difficult time. So let’s give our molting kids an extra special treat to show them how much we care. It will make your Eckie feel very special.

For more information about the Eclectus Diet please visit our website

The Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots contains 380+ pages of content dedicated to assisting owners care for their Eclectus.

It contains chapters on The Eclectus molt, diet, training, emergency care, bonding and much, much more

.Eclectus care

Download_on_the_iBookstore_Badge_US-UK_146x40_0824Web Eclectus book

Eclectus Care

The perfect Christmas gift for Eclectus lovers!

Eclectus careThe Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots is the first comprehensive iBook dedicated to assisting companion Eclectus owners care for their parrot. With over 380 pages of content, 245 full color photos, 14 videos and 40 illustrations; this book sets itself apart from any Eclectus book on the market.

Penned by an Eclectus specialist and self confessed parrot addict, the Author writes in a friendly, easy to read manner. She provides information and advice based on over a decade of experience keeping and breeding companion Eclectus parrots.

The Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots content guide:

About Eclectus

  • Introduction
  • Eckies in the wild
  • The Miracle of life
  • Battle of the sexes

Choosing your Eclectus

  • Choosing the right breeder
  • The importance of follow up service
  • Vet checks
  • The dangers of buying an unweaned bird

Caring for your Eclectus

  • Cage size and setup
  • Bringing your new Eckie home
  • Bonding
  • The blinking game
  • Establishing a routine
  • Baby calls and noise factor

The Eclectus diet

  • Dietary needs
  • Sprouted seed
  • Egg and biscuit
  • Recipes

Eclectus health

  • The Eclectus molt
  • Born to fly
  • Poop’ology
  • Weight checks
  • The importance of worming
  • Nail trimming
  • Stress bars and feather barring
  • Mising toes
  • Eckie safe plants

Dangers

  • Heavy metal poisoning
  • Household dangers
  • Abuse and neglect – there is no excuse

Emergency care

  • First aid kit
  • Emergency care
  • Crop impaction/stasis

Eclectus Behavior

  • Eckie body language
  • Eye pinning
  • Ghost chasing
  • Bad dreams
  • Freeze!
  • Eyes wide open
  • Zombie kids

Training

  • Showering with your parrot
  • Harness training
  • Recall training
  • Teaching your Eckie to talk

Eclectus Challenges

  • Hormonal Eckies
  • Introducing a second Eckie
  • What to do if your parrot escapes

Playtime

  • It’s time to play
  • DIY toys
  • Final word

Eclectus care

Download_on_the_iBookstore_Badge_US-UK_146x40_0824Web Eclectus book