Eclectus Parrots

Avian Movie Critics

Eclectus ParrotParrot Haven is home to 26 spoilt Eclectus parrots, one Green Cheeked Conure and a very self opinionated African Grey. All have their very specific likes and dislikes but none more so than our matriarch Eclectus parrot, Red.

Red began life as a precocious baby and grew into an even more precocious mature hen. She is very set in her ways and isn’t afraid to voice her opinion. From favorite foods, preferred perching locations even to certain rock bands, Red knows what she likes. Red often likes to join us at night while watching a movie. It’s a routine she knows well, she perches on my chest, pulls one little foot up against her body and settles in for the nights entertainment. Movie night with Red is always fun but we must choose the movie carefully, if its not to Red’s liking we are severely reprimanded.

Action movies are amongst her favorite, and car chases excite her like nothing else. Her little eyes light up as she watches the vehicles tear down the road at breakneck speed and she squeals with joy when they crash in a fiery wreck. However car chases are often accompanied by gun fire and this does not sit well with our Red. She yells ‘naughty’, ‘no’ and ‘stop it’ as the bullets fly. According to Red, the actors are doing something wrong and she must give them a piece of her mind. As with any good action movie, someone is inevitably shot and Red will often pipe up and ask ‘you all right?’, just to make sure the person writhing in pain understands her concern. We tell her ‘yes Red, they are fine’ and she happily snuggles back down to enjoy the rest of the movie.

I sometimes wonder whether our parrots believe the television is a window into another  world. They watch avidly, reacting to specific scenes as if they were watching reality play out.  I remember watching a scary movie many years ago when Red decided to join us. She perched in her usual position however it wasn’t long before she grew agitated. The images on screen were clearly upsetting her and she moved closer to me seeking reassurance. I turned the movie off immediately and switched to a comedy and she visibly relaxed and returned to her normal self. We now save horror movies for day’s when Red is playing with her boyfriend in the aviary. I would hate to scare our gorgeous girl.

So next time you are watching T.V with your parrot, take note of their response. Some parrots simply zone out and pay little to no attention to the screen, others watch intently, loosing themselves in the world of make believe. If your Eckie is like our Red, then it won’t be long before you are choosing movies based on your parrots specific preferences. You certainly know you are an Eckie slave when your feathered friend dictates the movies you watch.

 

 

Eclectus molting information

 Care for your Eclectus during their molt

Kirsten 068

After shivering through the cold winter months, Summer is finally here. It is a time for sunshine, weekend barbecues and relaxing by the pool. It is also the time when our Eckies begin to molt.

Parrot Haven is home to 25 Eckies and one precocious yet very special African Grey parrot and at the moment, all our feathered kids are molting. Our place is decorated with scatterings of feather casings, white fluffy down and the odd primary or two. The aviary is a variable smorgasbord of feathers, from tiny petite head feathers to beautiful tail plumage.

This happens twice year at Parrot Haven however the pre Christmas molt is always the heaviest. Molting can certainly take it’s toll on our parrots. I can only imagine how irritating it must be walking around like a pin cushion, as hundreds of new feathers erupt through the skin.

As parrot slaves, we must understand that molting affects our kids moods, dietary needs, appetite and even sleep patterns. It certainly takes a toll on our kids bodies and we must do all we can to ease our kids through this time.

What is molting?

Molting is a process where old feathers fall out and are replaced by new ones. Feathers are made from a protein called keratin, just like our hair and fingernails. Unlike skin, keratin is unable to repair itself. If a feather is damaged or frayed, it will remain that way until the parrot molts.

The importance of protein

When a parrot molts, protein is taken from the Eckie’s body. If a parrot is not provided with protein rich foods to supplement this output, their body will be depleted.

An Eckie suffering from protein deficiency will be tired, lethargic and irritable. It will prolong their molt and the newly molted feathers will look dull, lacking their trademark glossiness.

It is very important to feed your Eckie foods which are high in protein, such as:

  • Cooked meat and chicken
  • Boiled eggs (cooked right the way through)
  • Almonds
  • Pumpkin seeds (also known as pepitas)
  • Lentils and pulses
  • Chia
  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Sweet corn

Change in appetite

Molting affects our Eckies’ appetites. Some kids become ravenous eating machines, while others become very fussy eaters, craving certain foods and rejecting others. Monitor your Eckie’s appetite carefully when molting, and take note of specific foods they crave. Our feathered kids listen to their bodies, and will source foods that will help ease them through molting.

 Moodiness

Molting can make the demurest of Eckies cranky and short tempered. Their body is working in overdrive to produce hundreds of pin feathers and many become irritable. Please, do not take this personally as many people have experienced this with their feathered kids.

My hen, Red, is terribly short tempered while molting. I know there is very little room for error and if I mis-read her body language, I will receive a nasty bite. As much as this hurts, I don’t take this personally. I know that once she has finished molting, she will return to her sweet self.

Everyone copes with their Eckie’s moods differently. Some ignore cranky behavior, leaving their kid alone until they are in a better frame of mind. Others distract their Eckie by offering a new toy or food treats.

Some Eckies become little sooks. They seek the love and comfort of their owner and demand cuddles and affection. This too is normal. Some of our hens seek extra cuddles while molting. Once they have molted their neediness reduces and their moods return to normal.

Aloe spritzes

Aloe spritzes help moisturize the skin, keeping it soft and supple. This allows the developing pinfeathers to break through the skin more easily. It is simple and cheap to make.

We buy 100% pure aloe gel from our local health food store. We then put 1 tablespoon of aloe into a spray bottle and fill it with a cup of warm water. Our kids love being misted by the warm, moisturizing water, and the aloe gives their feathers a spectacular sheen.

Some people choose to use a pre-mixed aloe drink. Please ensure there are no additives before using this.

Sleepy time kids

Molting takes its toll on our kids’ small bodies. It takes a lot of energy to grow hundreds of feathers, and our Eckies become tired and lethargic. Your Eckie’s sleep routine may change around molting time.  Many will take long catnaps during the day. Others will want to go to bed earlier, or sleep in. They need this extra sleep; it helps the body recuperate, so when playtime rolls around, they are re-energized and ready for fun.

Lots of extra love

Molting is a stressful time for our feathered kids. They feel itchy and out of sorts. Some kids become despondent when they molt. They know they look scruffy and it really upsets them. They are such sensitive little souls.

As devoted Eckie parents, we want to do everything we can to help our kids through this difficult time. So let’s give our molting kids an extra special treat to show them how much we care. It will make your Eckie feel very special.

For more information about the Eclectus Diet please visit our website

The Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots contains 380+ pages of content dedicated to assisting owners care for their Eclectus.

It contains chapters on The Eclectus molt, diet, training, emergency care, bonding and much, much more

.Eclectus care

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Eclectus Care

The perfect Christmas gift for Eclectus lovers!

Eclectus careThe Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots is the first comprehensive iBook dedicated to assisting companion Eclectus owners care for their parrot. With over 380 pages of content, 245 full color photos, 14 videos and 40 illustrations; this book sets itself apart from any Eclectus book on the market.

Penned by an Eclectus specialist and self confessed parrot addict, the Author writes in a friendly, easy to read manner. She provides information and advice based on over a decade of experience keeping and breeding companion Eclectus parrots.

The Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots content guide:

About Eclectus

  • Introduction
  • Eckies in the wild
  • The Miracle of life
  • Battle of the sexes

Choosing your Eclectus

  • Choosing the right breeder
  • The importance of follow up service
  • Vet checks
  • The dangers of buying an unweaned bird

Caring for your Eclectus

  • Cage size and setup
  • Bringing your new Eckie home
  • Bonding
  • The blinking game
  • Establishing a routine
  • Baby calls and noise factor

The Eclectus diet

  • Dietary needs
  • Sprouted seed
  • Egg and biscuit
  • Recipes

Eclectus health

  • The Eclectus molt
  • Born to fly
  • Poop’ology
  • Weight checks
  • The importance of worming
  • Nail trimming
  • Stress bars and feather barring
  • Mising toes
  • Eckie safe plants

Dangers

  • Heavy metal poisoning
  • Household dangers
  • Abuse and neglect – there is no excuse

Emergency care

  • First aid kit
  • Emergency care
  • Crop impaction/stasis

Eclectus Behavior

  • Eckie body language
  • Eye pinning
  • Ghost chasing
  • Bad dreams
  • Freeze!
  • Eyes wide open
  • Zombie kids

Training

  • Showering with your parrot
  • Harness training
  • Recall training
  • Teaching your Eckie to talk

Eclectus Challenges

  • Hormonal Eckies
  • Introducing a second Eckie
  • What to do if your parrot escapes

Playtime

  • It’s time to play
  • DIY toys
  • Final word

Eclectus care

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Parrot safety

Keeping your parrot safe during the holiday seasonEclectus Care

Christmas is the most magical time of the year. Trees are decorated, tinsel draped and lights are strung turning our home into a twinkling fairy land. This is also a time when parrot owners must take extra precautions to ensure their featherd kids remain safe during the holiday season.

Parrots are curious critters, they simply love to explore and get into as much mischief as possible. Sparkling decorations capture their attention and it is almost impossible for our parrots to resist the temptation to chew. Many Christmas ornaments contain heavy metals such as glitter, tinsel, wire hangers and metallic parts. If a parrot ingests particles of heavy metal, the results could be devastating.

When heavy metal particles are ingested, they begin to poison the parrot, affecting the kidneys, blood cells, intestines and nervous system. This makes the parrot very ill and can cause rapid death. However, prevention is better than cure and once parrot owners understand the dangers, they can take steps to ensure their kids remain safe during the holiday season.

Keeping our parrots our of harms way is relatively simple. We encourage owners to be vigilant and monitor their parrots while they are out of their cage. Always ensure decorations are hung well away from your parrots cage. It is amazing how far a little foot can reach through the bars of a cage, especially if there is something on the other side that piques their interest.

Please, don’t let your parrots play on or under the Christmas tree. If they were to chew an ornament they may accidentally ingest particles of heavy metal. Lights also attract our feathered kids attention and if chewed, could result in a nasty shock. Exposed wires pose a threat as they are made from heavy metals so please, keep your parrot away from the tree, lights and any decoration.

Glitter transfers very easily and it is amazing how quickly it can spread throughout the home. This can pose a threat to parrots who enjoy walking around on the ground or playing on the floor. When the parrot preens, they may accidentally ingest particles of glitter.  Be sure to vacuum regularly to remove small pieces of tinsel and glitter.

Owners must also be careful when adorning their home with plants. Some commonly used Christmas plants pose a threat to our feathered kids. Holly, Mistletoe, Poinsettia and some evergreens are poisonous and potentially deadly to parrots. For a comprehensive list of safe and deadly plants please visit http://www.eclectusparrotbreeders.com/parrot-safe-plants.html This list was provided by a qualified Horticulturist with over 25 years experience in his field.

Let’s keep our parrots safe and be mindful of the following items:

  • Glitter
  • Metallic gift wrap
  • Tinsel/angel hair
  • Decorative lights and electrical cords
  • Ornaments
  • Some decorative plants
  • Scented candles
  • Open fire places
  • Yule logs – some contain heavy metals
  • Christmas ribbon and bows
  • Metallic table confetti
  • Bon Bons – often made from metallic paper
  • Non stick cookware – ’tis the season to cook!
  • Young children and guests – please monitor your parrots stress levels and ensure your guests understand the importance of parrot safety.

This being said, the holiday season should be a relaxing and enjoyable time for all involved. Once we understand the potential dangers in the home we are able to keep our kids safe so that everyone can enjoy a wonderful and festive Christmas.

For more information about keeping your parrot safe in the home, please visit our website: http://www.eclectusparrotbreeders.com/dangers-to-eclectus.htm

Eclectus care

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The Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots provides detailed information and teaches owners how to confidently care for their parrot. Filled with real life examples and amusing anecdotes, it gives insight into life through your parrot’s eyes.

 

 

Eclectus Book

 View the exciting new promo for our book ‘The Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots’

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Bringing your new Eckie home

Bringing your new Eckie home

The long awaited day is finally drawing near. Soon it will be time to bring your new Eckie home. Our clients tell us they feel both elated and nervous. Some have waited a very long time for their new addition and are almost bursting with excitement and anticipation. Whether you are purchasing a baby or adopting an older Eckie, you want to make a good first impression and ensure you start your relationship off on the right foot.

Saying goodbye to everything they know

The most important thing to remember when you bring your Eckie home is that they may be very scared. They have left the comfort of their home and many are meeting their new family for the very first time. Some Eckies are lucky enough to live close to their new human flock, while others must travel great distances. Either way, it’s new, it’s scary, their carer or old family is nowhere to be found, their siblings are gone and they are all alone.

They have no way to communicate effectively and no one understands what they are saying. Some Eckies come from breeders or owners who understand their body language and know exactly what they want. They can communicate easily and know their every need will be met. They lived an idyllic life filled with love, friendship and routine. Now it is gone and they don’t know how to cope. They are pining for their family, breeder and siblings and are don’t understand why life has changed. I liken this transition to a young child being left alone in a foreign country. They don’t know anyone, their parents are gone and they can’t speak the language. The child would be terrified and our feathered kids are no different.

First impressions count

This may sound clichéd, but it’s true. First impressions are lasting and you want your Eckie to know that you’re someone they can trust. This is why it is so important to follow a few simple rules to help pave the way for a fantastic relationship.

The first week is going to be the hardest for both owner and Eckie. The owner wants nothing more than to snuggle their new kid and shower them with love, toys and all the goodies they have bought. The Eckie is overwhelmed by the change—their world has been turned upside down and they have no idea what to do, where they are or who to trust.

It is up to us as loving parents to put our own desires aside and do all we can to show our kids that we can be trusted and their forever home is going to be filled with love and happiness. To assist with this, we can prepare our family and friends for the new arrival so everyone understands what they must do during the settling-in period.

This is a short excerpt from our book: The Ultimate Guide to Eclectus Parrots. This chapter explains how to settle your Eckie into their new home. This is a critical time for both Eckie and owner. Follow our technique and you will be setting yourself up for success.

Included in this chapter:

  • Keeping the children happy
  • Selecting a primary carer
  • Local pick-up
  • Travel cages
  • Preparing your Eckie’s travel cage
  • Eckie Eve
  • The big day
  • Airport pickup
  • Using your Eckies name
  • The drive home
  • Home at last
  • Why won’t they eat?
  • Feathered extroverts
  • Kick back and relax
  • This is what we advise our clients to do
  • Don’t create a rod for your back
  • The all important routine
  • Tough nuts to crack
  • Please show your Eckie the respect they deserve
  • Your hard work will be rewarded

Eclectus Parrot Book

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Why the relationship between breeder and “aviary bird” matters

One of the things that really impressed me about Kirsten before coming to Australia was how involved she was with her breeding birds. As an Eclectus owner myself, I was always curious about what the parents of my Eckie hen was like. What kind of personality did they have? Were they quiet, curious or playful?

Unfortunately in the avicultural industry, it is a common belief that a breeder must not interact very much with their breeding parrots. “Feed them and leave them” was the phrase that I heard a lot. For other parrot species that may indeed be the case, however for Eclectus parrots Kirsten has proved otherwise.

Being a parrot lover, taking such a hands-off stance was something that Kirst could not do. Having raised her very first Eclectus pair (Red and Sprout), she was heavily involved in their everyday lives. They grew up in her home and she included them in many of her daily activities like cooking, cleaning and taking care of her son. To this day, Red still loves to be included when Kirst is preparing a meal – helping chop up fresh vegetables (taking small ‘tasting bites’) and talking extensively while we both work in the kitchen.

As she grew her Eckie flock, the routine stayed the same. Once they all had a large outdoor aviary to share she would spend a lot of time with them watching their personalities grow and seeing friendships and couples form. This became invaluable as they started breeding.

Having such a strong bond with her breeding Eclectus enabled Kirsten to know what personality traits her babies would develop

This insight helped Kirst to pair a baby with a client in a way that few other breeders have. During her interview process, Kirsten would try and understand what a potential client was like and what kind of baby they needed. If the individual was approved for one of her babies, then she could pair them up. Sometimes this process required the client to wait as much as a year before they could have a baby, but the results were worth it.

Our testimonials page is full of clients who have been matched perfectly with a baby Eclectus – because of the time Kirsten spent with her breeding kids.

This interaction has not inhibited their breeding. Red – one of our best breeders – often hatched and raised 3 babies at a time. All of her babies and in fact all of our babies raised here at Parrot Haven have always been extremely healthy with very strong personalities.

Kirsten has always believed that if her parrots were happy, then they would breed happy babies–and that has proved true every time

We have recently taken some video footage of us in our communal aviary which shows the kind of relationship that we have with our kids. Not only do they enjoy our interaction with them but sometimes it is difficult for us to leave as they simply will cling onto us and not want us to leave the flight!

Aviary Time from Parrot Haven on Vimeo.

Having this kind of bond with our parrots is absolutely heartwarming and we wouldn’t trade that for anything. Now that our kids are retired we’re able to enjoy a perfectly healthy ‘pet’ relationship with them because they have always been treated as members of our flock. This has helped their transition from breeding to pet happen seamlessly.

If you are looking to buy an Eclectus parrot – please do as much research as you can about any potential breeders you wish to purchase from. Not all breeders are the same and in our experience, many breeders can be downright deceitful. It is important to ask any potential breeder the kind of questions that will help you ascertain whether or not they are worth their salt as an aviculturist. If you have any hesitation about a breeder, then move on until you find the right one. When you do find a reputable breeder then spread the word. Once enough people start demanding better standards in the industry then the industry can make a change for the better!

Purchasing a parrot online

Parrot Haven babies are always in high demand. There have been times when clients have waited over 8 months for one of our precious babies. Sometimes we receive emails from people wanting to buy our Eckies from different countries. They are disappointed when they discover they can’t buy our baby and ask if we can recommend a breeder who raises their babies in the same manner we do. We provide them with a list of questions to ask breeders, to ensure they are buying a healthy, well socialized baby from a highly experienced aviculturist.

The joys of technology

There are many places people can find parrots for sale online. Sites ranging from specialist breeders  websites to forums and even free ad sites that allow people to post pets for sale along side bus tickets.

When looking for a companion parrot – we always encourage people to arm themselves with as much knowledge as possible before they commit to a breeder. This knowledge not only helps them care for their parrot to the best of their ability, but also prevents them from being scammed by people posing as breeders. Some people have little to no experience hand raising parrots, sadly, it is the baby parrots who are affected.

Know your breeder

It is extremely important to understand who you are buying from. The internet has revolutionised many industries – opening the way for people to conduct business so much easier. However it also provides more unethical people a mask to hide behind. This was proved to us recently by an individual posing as an experienced breeder. This person claimed to be a specialist breeder with many years experience. We knew this was not the case and when we chose not to promote his newly started breeding business we were met with verbal threats of physical harassment. The email we received was so disturbing that we were advised by our lawyer to report it to the police.  We were deeply disturbed by his defamatory comments and threats of harassment. We worried what type of environment the baby parrots were being exposed to. How was this affecting them and shaping their upbringing?

When buying a pet parrot online it is important to exercise caution. Whether you choose to buy direct from a breeder, a pet store or an online ‘trading’ site – do your homework. Take the time to ensure the person you are buying from really does have the credentials they promote. This may save you from a great deal of heart ache later.  Here are some tips we recommend:

Know who you are dealing with

While talking with the person you are interested in buying from, try to ascertain who they are as a person. This may sound strange, but it’s an important step because you want to find people who are committed to their craft and raises their babies in a loving, caring environment.

Baby parrots are in the breeders care 24/7 for many months. The aviculturists hand raising technique and the time they spend with their babies helps shape the baby parrots developing personality

Ensure your chosen breeder has a great deal of experience working with  parrots. You want to feel comfortable in their ability as a breeder because you will need to turn to them when you have questions as your parrot grows and matures

We set up a forum dedicated to helping our own clients and others who were unable to receive the help and follow up service they required.

Sadly, some people are merely intent on making a quick sale. We advise people to buy from a breeder who truly cares about their babies. One who understands the personalities of their breeding parrots and babies. One who can match you with your perfect feathered friend. I believe it is very important to choose a breeder who has spent many years working and specializing with your chosen species of parrot.

We have met a few people via our forum who bought a parrot and later discovered the breeder did not offer the follow up service they claimed on their site. This is where doing your homework pays off.

If someone claims to have 5 or 10 years experience, ask for testimonials from their past clients. If they have been working in the industry for a long time they will have a solid clientele and a good reputation with many testimonials.  Ask the breeder if you can contact 3-4 of their past clients. Don’t feel strange contacting them. If a client is happy with their parrot, they should be more than happy to promote the breeder.  Ask about their experience with the breeder. Do they provide a good follow up service? Do they truly care about their babies and their clients? Are they knowledgable and professional. If you have any doubts or the testimonials sounded false, move on to the next breeder on your list. This is a big decision, you want to know you are buying from the best breeder possible.

Be respectful

Professional aviculturists are extremely busy, their life revolves around their parrots and spare time is a rarity.  We always appreciate clients who email us first to organize a time to chat. If you do call, be sure to ask the breeder if it a convenient time to talk. A little courtesy goes a long way and I know we are more likely to part with one of our precious babies when the client shows respect.

It is important to have a list of questions to ask your breeder. Take the time to write these down before you call.

You can learn a lot about a breeder simply by talking to them. Those who are truly passionate about their parrots will stand out. This is not something you can fake, true commitment comes from the heart. Be sure to contact a number of breeders, never buy from the first place you call. This will help you compare different breeders and find one that is right for you. Don’t feel bad about asking the breeder questions. A professional breeder who truly cares about their birds will understand why you are asking. They want to know their baby is going to a loving, forever home and will be more likely to part with one of their babies.

Follow up

Maintain contact with your breeder during your babies hand raising process.  Emailing is a great way to do this. We setup a forum for exactly this reason, we wanted our clients to be a part of their babies life and watch as they grow and develop. Ask for photos of your baby as they grow. Always be polite and acknowledge that you appreciate their time. Again, professional aviculturists are very busy. On average, Kirsten receives between 50-60 emails from Eckie owners asking for help and advice – some emails come from breeders with questions about their neonate Eclectus parrots. It takes time to respond to everyone – she does this while caring for 25 Eclectus parrots and writing her book. So be polite and respectful. If you think of questions you forgot to ask while on the phone, ask them via email.

If needed, schedule another phone call as a follow-up. This helps the breeder appreciate that you are excited about your new parrot baby and committed to your decision. It will also help them get a sense for who you are. When Kirsten was breeding, she would get to know each of her clients individually, talking with them sometimes on a daily basis via our forum. This helped her find the perfect baby for her client. Every parrot is unique, no two are the same and an experienced, caring aviculturist will want to know their baby is going to a home that suits their personality.

When the lines of communication are open, then it’s a good sign that you are dealing with a person who is honest and wants the best for their baby parrot.

Be safe

Sadly, the selling of unweaned parrots and birds who have been raised poorly by inexperienced ‘breeders’ occurs all too often. We  actively help  people nurse sick parrots back to health or assist those who have bought unweaned parrots. This is the down side to aviculture, some breeders may not take their responsibility seriously, to the detriment of both the parrot and the new owner.

If you see an ad that looks suspicious or unethical (such as an ad for an unweaned parrot), please take the time to report it to the site administrator. The selling of unweaned parrots is grossly unethical and ultimately dangerous to the poor baby parrot. Aviculturists must take their responsibility seriously. Raising a baby parrot is hard work, it takes a great deal of knowledge and skill to ease them through their different developmental stages. Professional breeders know how to raise large, healthy parrots. Please, don’t buy unweaned parrots, leave the hand raising to the professionals.

If things go wrong

Some people buy a parrot from a seemingly reputable breeder or individual and things go terribly wrong. We had a forum member who this happened to. It turned out the baby parrot she bought was in poor health and almost died because he had been weaned far too early. This resulted in astronomical vet bills. The correspondence between the “breeder” and the buyer escalated into a heated situation.

If you have purchased from a breeder or individual who has threatened you in any way, then you need to report the incident to the local police. They can file an incident report and if needed pursue the matter further.

Needless to say, any breeder who uses threats – no matter how empty – should be avoided.

Help improve the industry

Sadly, there is a harsher side to aviculture. Kirsten has recieved countless emails over the year from people who have purchased unweaned babies, birds from inexperienced breeders and even those who rescued abused parrots. She has actively helped educate people, sharing her knowledge so that people demand nothing but the best from their breeder. This education goes beyond care and maintenance for Eclectus Parrots – we try to educate people so they may make a good decision when it comes time to buy a baby parrot.

When people start demanding better service and care from the breeding industry, then things can change. Help encourage responsible breeding practices by interviewing your breeder and asking the right questions. When you find a reputable breeder, then spread the word. These people need all the support you can give.